A Daily Dose of History

tiny-librarian:

The three wives of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor:

Margarita Teresa of Spain: Both his niece and first cousin, the couple were married in 1666 when she was just 15. Despite their age difference, they were very happy together and had a lot in common. They had four children, but only one daughter survived to adulthood. After being weakened by so many pregnancies and miscarriages in such a short time period, she died at the young age of 21, leaving behind a devastated husband who had truly loved her.


Claudia Felicitas of Austria: The need for a male heir prompted him to marry again barely six months after his first wife’s death. She was a young and pretty woman, but Leopold was still in mourning for his first wife and is reported to have said she was “not like my only Margareta”. They had two short lived daughters, and she died after only 3 years of marriage.

Eleonore Magdalene of Neuburg: He married his thrid wife the same year as his second wife died. The bride was not very enthusiastic about the match, having been brought up to an extreme degree of Catholicism, and had apparently wished to become a nun. They had ten children, and both of their sons became Holy Roman Emperors after their father’s death.

Mariemont High School’s 1958 prom.

todayinhistory:

June 19th 1978: Garfield debutsOn this day in 1978, the popular comic strip Garfield was launched in 4 newspapers. The comic revolves around a cat (Garfield) and his owner Jon Arbuckle and was created by Jim Davis. Garfield was a huge success, and is now the world’s most widely distributed comic strip
Above is the first Garfield strip from 1978.

todayinhistory:

June 19th 1978: Garfield debuts

On this day in 1978, the popular comic strip Garfield was launched in 4 newspapers. The comic revolves around a cat (Garfield) and his owner Jon Arbuckle and was created by Jim Davis. Garfield was a huge success, and is now the world’s most widely distributed comic strip

Above is the first Garfield strip from 1978.

Signing yearbooks before graduation, 1941.

unhistorical:

June 12, 1963: Medgar Evers is assassinated.

Medgar Evers was a civil rights activist who, until his assassination on June 12, 1963 outside his home in Mississippi, worked with the NAACP in his home state to organize marches, lead protests and boycotts, and help disenfranchised African-Americans register to vote. Evers was not the first or only activist to be murdered while serving in the Deep South during this period, nor was he as publicly recognized as Malcolm X or Martin Luther King, Jr., but his murder remains one of the most infamous events of the Civil Rights Movement. 

Evers was shot and killed in his own driveway, in front of his children, as he exited his car the morning after President John F. Kennedy delivered an address in support of civil rights, which urged the American public to stand behind a piece of legislation which would later become the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. As a prominent black civil rights leader within his own community, Evers and his family were targeted by militant white supremacists with threats of violence and with violent acts up until his assassination. The man who shot at Evers and killed him with a single bullet to the back in the early hours of June 12 was one of these supremacists, a member of the White Citizens’ Council (and later of the KKK) named Byron De La Beckwith, who was tried twice — and acquitted twice, by all-white, all-male juries — for Evers’ murder. De La Beckwith was finally convicted thirty-one years later in 1994 and sentenced to life in prison; Evers, a US Army sergeant who served for three years in the European Theatre of World War II, was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. The week after Evers’ death, President Kennedy submitted to Congress his promised civil rights bill.

railways-and-roses:

Photograph of a (Yiddish) note, written in pencil, found in the clothes of a female corpse, during an exhumation carried out in October 1944, at the mass murder site of Jews near the village of Antanase, near the town of Obeliai, Rokiskis District, Lithuania. It reads: “My dearest, before I die, I am writing a few words, We are about to die, five thousand innocent people. They are cruelly shooting us. Kisses to you all, Mira.”

railways-and-roses:

Photograph of a (Yiddish) note, written in pencil, found in the clothes of a female corpse, during an exhumation carried out in October 1944, at the mass murder site of Jews near the village of Antanase, near the town of Obeliai, Rokiskis District, Lithuania. It reads: “My dearest, before I die, I am writing a few words, We are about to die, five thousand innocent people. They are cruelly shooting us. Kisses to you all, Mira.”

nationalpost:

Fool for love: How a boy with ‘no prospects’ has stayed married for 70 years to a beautiful dancer
Bob Shapiro didn’t know how to dance. But he knew how to look cool, and so he struck a pose, as teenagers do, sitting on the edge of a table, one leg dangling down, not watching — but watching — the dancers at a tiny club for Jewish kids in Brighton, England, whirling round and round.

A girl across the room was watching him, watching. She had porcelain skin, sparkling blue eyes and jet-black shoulder-length hair. The girl across the room was gorgeous and then she was standing right in front of Bob Shapiro, sizing up his 17-year-old self, asking him a question he didn’t have a very good answer for.

“Why aren’t you dancing?”

Bob mumbled something about not knowing how before mumbling — yes — after the girl, Anita Bazar, a 19-year-old knockout, told him she could teach him.

“I was shocked,” says Bob Shapiro, some 75 years after his first dance with the woman who became his wife. “I have never really been able to figure out why Anita picked me.” (Photo: Matthew Sherwood for National Post)

erikkwakkel:

Fun Medieval Doodles

Here is a small selection of doodles I tweeted over the past year (@erik_kwakkel). Although they are usually not exactly eye-candy, they are easy to like. I think this is because they are often very funny, but also because the activity is such a familiar one. Almost without thinking we ourselves doodle on notepads, post-it notes or in the margin of the newspaper.

While our drawings are often the result of boredom, in the Middle Ages there was often a more pragmatic rationale behind their creation. In some cases they were a response to the text, such as the Adam and Eve doodle above. Moreover, many were the fruit of correcting the nib of the pen, like the little dog’s head. They are the medieval equivalent, as it were, of our scratching on a piece of paper to get the ink flowing.

In other cases still it remains a mystery what the doodling scribe was thinking. Why draw the skeleton that seems to hold a glass, for example? Is it a warning that our enjoying the delights of this planet will ultimately come to an end? A medieval campaign against riding your horse while under influence? Whatever the meaning of this poor guy with his drink may be, and in spite of the fact we are reminded of our own mortality, sketches like this do brighten the page - and my day.

life:

LIFE.com celebrates Father’s Day with a special gallery featuring classic portraits of famous dads and their daughters.
Pictured: John F. Kennedy with daughter Caroline, 1958.
(Ed Clark—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

LIFE.com celebrates Father’s Day with a special gallery featuring classic portraits of famous dads and their daughters.

Pictured: John F. Kennedy with daughter Caroline, 1958.

(Ed Clark—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

antiquatedfashions:

Woman’s Evening Gown from Europe, 1825
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Gown is silk net with silk embroidery and silk satin trim. The style of the net overlay is reminiscent of this gown from 1818, and these dresses only became more popular with the rise of the industrial age, and the easy creation (and thus reduced price) of ultra-sheer machine net fabric.

antiquatedfashions:

Woman’s Evening Gown from Europe, 1825

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Gown is silk net with silk embroidery and silk satin trim. The style of the net overlay is reminiscent of this gown from 1818, and these dresses only became more popular with the rise of the industrial age, and the easy creation (and thus reduced price) of ultra-sheer machine net fabric.

odditiesoflife:

Oldest Footprint Ever Found
This fossil footprint found near Ileret, Kenya, is 1.5 million years old. These footprints are the oldest ever found of the human genus.

odditiesoflife:

Oldest Footprint Ever Found

This fossil footprint found near Ileret, Kenya, is 1.5 million years old. These footprints are the oldest ever found of the human genus.

kierenwalkered:

History Meme
 TWO NATURAL DISASTERS // THE 1906 SAN FRANCISCO EARTHQUAKE
“The most terrible thing I saw was the futile struggle of a policeman and others to rescue a man who was pinned down in burning wreckage. The helpless man watched it in silence till the fire began burning his feet. Then he screamed and begged to be killed. The policeman took his name and address and shot him through the head.” (x)

todayinhistory:

May 23rd 1934: Bonnie and Clyde killed

On this day in 1934 the infamous American bank robbing duo Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were ambushed by police and killed in Louisiana. Bonnie and Clyde and their gang were outlaws who robbed banks and killed several police officers and civilians from 1931 to 1934. The couple became legendary for their exploits and their love story, especially after Arthur Penn’s 1967 film ‘Bonnie and Clyde’.

“Some day they’ll go down together;
They’ll bury them side by side;
To few it’ll be grief-
To the law a relief-
But it’s death for Bonnie and Clyde.”
- from
Bonnie’s poem about the duo

todayinhistory:

November 1st 1894: Nicholas II becomes Tsar

On this day in 1894, Nicholas Romanov became the new Tsar of Russia after his father Tsar Alexander III died; Nicholas was aged 26. Nicholas felt unprepared and inexperienced to lead his country. His rule saw Russia’s defeat in the Russo-Japanese War and began Russia’s disastrous involvement in World War One. He was known for violent suppression of protests. He ruled Russia until his abdication on March 2nd 1917 following the Bolshevik revolution, he and his family were then imprisoned and eventually executed by a Bolshevik firing squad in 1918.